Apply for Federal Direct Stafford Loan

Home / Financial Aid / Apply for Federal Direct Stafford Loan
Important Note

Students applying for student loans must also complete the financial-aid application process.

Students must be enrolled in six credits to receive student loans.

An education loan is a form of financial aid that must be repaid, with interest.  Student loans are loans taken out in the name of the student. They must be used for educationally related expenses, such as tuition, housing, books, and any other cost associated with going to college. Whether or not to take out a student loan to fund your education can be a big decision.  It is important to look at your Financial Aid Package and create a budget of your educational expenses to determine if a Federal Direct Stafford Loan is right for you.

 

Application Process

First-Time Borrower

If you are new to the college, or have not received a Federal Direct Stafford loan from Clover Park Technical College in the last year, you are required to complete Entrance Counseling and a Master Promissory Note (MPN). To complete these steps, go to www.studentloans.gov.  The school will be notified electronically within three to five business days from the time of completion. You can check your student portal to see when Clover Park has received notification that this requirement has been completed.  

Please Note: Students who are first time borrowers at CPTC must serve a 30 day waiting period and will not receive the first disbursement of their loans until approximately the 35th day of the quarter. This applies only to the first quarter that students receive loan funds. 

Returning Borrower

***NEW FOR CONTINUING STUDENTS *** Starting Summer 2014, Continuing students must complete Financial Awareness counseling every academic year. The website for Financial Awareness counseling is www.studentloans.gov . The school will be notified electronically within three to five business days from the time of completion. You can check your student portal to see when Clover Park has received notification that this requirement has been completed. 

If you previously received a Direct loan for a prior year you do not need to complete an entrance counseling and Master Promissory Note. The Department of Education allows a borrower to receive additional Direct loans on a single Master Promissory Note for up to 10 years.

Federal Direct Parent Plus Loans

Direct Loans are federal loans to help you pay for the cost of your child’s education expenses. Parent Plus loans are only available to Dependent Students. To apply for a Federal Direct Stafford Loan go to www.studentloans.gov and complete a Parent Plus Application and Parent Plus Master Promissory Note. The school will be notified electronically within three to five business days from the time of completion. For more information about Federal Direct Parent Plus Loans click here.

Exit Counseling

Student loan recipients must complete Exit Counseling during their last quarter at Clover Park. Exit Counseling provides students with the information they need before they enter into repayment, including the different repayment options available to them and what to do if they ever have difficulty making their loan payments. To complete the Exit Counseling requirement go to www.studentloans.gov and Select Exit Counseling. The school will be notified electronically within three to five business days from the time of completion. For more information on Exit Counseling, click here

Q&A

  • Direct Subsidized are loans in which the government subsidizes or pays the interest that accrues on student loans while the student is in school and in their grace period.
  • Direct Unsubsidized are loans in which the student is responsible for the interest which accrues on his/her loans while in school and during the grace period. Interest can be added to the principal balance through a process called capitalization.

IMPORTANT! Students taking nursing (LPN or RN) academic prerequisites who do not have a conditionally accepted LPN/RN application submitted to the Nursing Department must apply for a student loan, as they do not qualify for grant assistance. They qualify for student loans only, and only for a period of twelve consecutive months. Students in the Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) program are not eligible for federal student loans.

Dependent Subsidized and/or Unsubsidized Additional Unsubsidized Annual Limit
1st Year $3,500 $2,000 $5,500
2nd Year $4,500 $2,000 $6,500
Independent      
1st Year $3,500 $6,000 $9,500
2nd Year $4,500 $6,000 $10,500

*A second year student is defined as a student that has earned 45 college level or more credits at CPTC towards their current program of study.

When a student applies for a student loan the financial aid office will award you the max amount eligible for within your assigned financial aid budget. If you wish to reduce the amount you will need to complete a Financial Aid Revision Form, and return it to the financial aid office.

All students must be enrolled on at least a half-time basis (at least six credits per quarter) in order to qualify for a student loan disbursement.

IMPORTANT! Students taking nursing (LPN or RN) academic prerequisites who do not have a conditionally accepted LPN/RN application submitted to the Nursing Department must apply for a student loan, as they do not qualify for grant assistance. They qualify for student loans only, and only for a period of twelve consecutive months. Students in the Certified Nursing Assistant (CAN) program are not eligible for federal student loans.

Students have six months after you cease attending, or drop below half time.

If you're having trouble making payments on your loans, contact your loan servicer as soon as possible. Your servicer will work with you to determine the best option for you. Options include:

  • Changing repayment plans
  • Repayment plans and calculators
  • Requesting a deferment: If you meet certain requirements, a deferment allows you to temporarily stop making payments on your loan.
  • Requesting a forbearance: If you don't meet the eligibility requirements for a deferment but are temporarily unable to make your loan payments, then (in limited circumstances) a forbearance allows you to temporarily stop making payments on your loan, temporarily make smaller payments, or extend the time for making payments.

If you stop making payments and don't get a deferment or forbearance, your loan could go into default (see Default section below), which has serious consequences.

If you default, it means you failed to make payments on your student loan according to the terms of your promissory note, the binding legal document you signed at the time you took out your loan. In other words, you failed to make your loan payments as scheduled. Your school, the financial institution that made or owns your loan, your loan guarantor, and the federal government all can take action to recover the money you owe. Here are some consequences of default:

  • National credit bureaus can be notified of your default, which will harm your credit rating, making it hard to buy a car or a house.
  • You will be ineligible for additional federal student aid if you decide to return to school.
  • Loan payments can be deducted from your paycheck.
  • State and federal income tax refunds can be withheld and applied toward the amount you owe.
  • You will have to pay late fees and collection costs on top of what you already owe.
  • You can be sued.

    For more information and to learn what actions to take if you default on your loans see the Department of Education’s Default Resolution Group Website.

Attention First Time Borrowers Attending CPTC between July 1, 2013 and June 18, 2014

Time Limitation on Direct Subsidized Loan Eligibility for First-Time Borrowers on or after July 1, 2013

Maximum Eligibility period to receive Direct Subsidized Loans

There is a limit on the maximum period of time (measured in academic years) that you can receive Direct Subsidized Loans. In general, you may not receive Direct Subsidized Loans for more than 150% of the published length of your program. This is called your “maximum eligibility period.” You can usually find the published length of any program of study in your school’s catalog.

For example, if you are enrolled in a 4-year bachelor’s degree program, the maximum period for which you can receive Direct Subsidized Loans is 6 years (150% of 4 years = 6 years). If you are enrolled in a 2-year associate degree program, the maximum period for which you can receive Direct Subsidized Loans is 3 years (150% of 2 years = 3 years).

Your maximum eligibility period is based on the published length of your current program. This means that your maximum eligibility period can change if you change programs. Also, if you receive Direct Subsidized Loans for one program and then change to another program, the Direct Subsidized Loans you received for the earlier program will generally count against your new maximum eligibility period.

Periods that count against your maximum eligibility period

The periods of time that count against your maximum eligibility period are periods of enrollment (also known as “loan periods”) for which you received Direct Subsidized Loans.

For example, if you are a full-time student and you receive a Direct Subsidized Loan that covers the fall and spring semesters (a full academic year), this will count as one year against your maximum eligibility period.

If you receive a Direct Subsidized Loan for a period of enrollment that is shorter than a full academic year, the period that counts against your maximum usage period will generally be reduced accordingly.

For example, if you are a full-time student and you receive a Direct Subsidized Loan that covers the fall semester but not the spring semester, this will count as one-half of a year against your maximum eligibility period.

With one exception, the amount of a Direct Subsidized Loan you receive for a period of enrollment does not affect how much of your maximum eligibility period you have used. That is, even if you receive a Direct Subsidized Loan in an amount that is less than the full annual loan limit, that lesser amount does not reduce the amount of your maximum eligibility period you have used. The one exception applies if you receive the full annual loan limit for a loan period that does not cover the whole academic year. In that case, the loan will count as one year against your maximum eligibility period regardless of your enrollment status (half-time, three-quarter time, or full-time).

Effect of borrowing while enrolled part-time

If you receive a Direct Subsidized Loan when you are enrolled less than full-time, the period that is counted against your maximum eligibility period will be reduced.

For example, if you are enrolled half-time and receive a Direct Subsidized Loan for a period of enrollment that covers a full academic year, this will count as only one-half of a year against your maximum eligibility period.

Loss of eligibility for additional Direct Subsidized Loans and becoming responsible for paying interest on Direct Subsidized Loans

After you have received Direct Subsidized Loans for your maximum eligibility period, you are no longer eligible to receive additional Direct Subsidized Loans. However, you may continue to receive Direct Unsubsidized Loans.

In addition, if you continue to be enrolled in any undergraduate program after you have received Direct Subsidized Loans for your maximum eligibility period, we will no longer (with certain exceptions) pay the interest that accrues on your Direct Subsidized Loans for periods when we would normally would have done so. The chart below provides examples of these circumstances.

Do I become responsible for paying the interest that accrues on my Direct Subsidized Loans because ...

I am no longer eligible for Direct Subsidized Loans and I stay enrolled in my current program? Yes

I am no longer eligible for Direct Subsidized Loans, did not graduate from my prior program, and am enrolled in an undergraduate program that is the same length or shorter than my prior program? Yes

I transferred into the shorter program and lost eligibility for Direct Subsidized Loans because I have received Direct Subsidized loans for a period that equals or exceeds my new, lower maximum eligibility period, which is based on the length of the new program? Yes

I was no longer eligible for Direct Subsidized Loans, did not graduate from my prior program, and am enrolled in an undergraduate program that is longer than my prior program? No

I lose eligibility for Direct Subsidized Loans and immediately withdraw from my program?No

I graduated from my prior program prior to or upon meeting the 150% limit, and enroll in an undergraduate program that is the same length or shorter than my prior program? No

I enroll in a graduate or professional program? No

I enroll in preparatory coursework that I am required to complete to enroll in a graduate or professional program? No

I enroll in a teacher certification program (where my school does not award an academic credential)? No

Remember, your maximum eligibility period can change if you enroll in a different program. So, if you received Direct Subsidized Loans for your maximum eligibility period for one program and then enroll in a longer program, you will not become responsible for interest that accrues on your Direct Subsidized Loans.

If you meet any of the conditions on the prior page, you will become responsible for the interest that accrues on your Direct Subsidized Loans, from the date of your enrollment after meeting the 150% limit, during periods when we would have normally paid the interest for you. Below is a chart that summarizes the periods when we normally pay the interest on your Direct Subsidized Loans, and an explanation and what happens after you become responsible for the interest.

During what period am I responsible for paying the interest on my Direct Subsidized Loans?

  Before meeting the 150% limit? After meeting the 150% limit?
While enrolled in school at least half-time No Yes
During my grace period on loans first disbursed (paid out) July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014 Yes Yes
During my grace period on loans first disbursed (paid out) July 1, 2014 or after No Yes
During deferment periods No Yes
During certain periods of repayment under the Income-Based Repayment or Pay As You Earn Plan No Yes
During forbearance periods Yes Yes
During all other periods of repayment Yes Yes

If you become responsible for the interest that accrues on your Direct Subsidized Loans, any interest that you do not pay will be capitalized (added to your loan principal balance) at the end of the grace, deferment, or other periods. Capitalized interest increases your loan principal, increases your monthly payment amount under most Direct Loan repayment plans, and causes you to pay more interest over the life of your loan.

Your federal loan servicer will notify you if you become responsible for paying the interest on your Direct Subsidized Loans.

Regaining eligibility for Direct Subsidized Loans

If you become ineligible for Direct Subsidized Loans because you have received Direct Subsidized Loans for your maximum eligibility period, you may again become eligible to receive Direct Subsidized Loans if you enroll in a new program that is longer than your previous program.

If you regain eligibility to receive additional Direct Subsidized Loans because you enrolled a program that is longer than your prior program and you previously became responsible for paying all of the interest that accrues on your Direct Subsidized Loans, we will pay the interest that accrues on your new loans during the periods described in the chart above.